Thus the soul quenches its hunger and listens to its purposes. It is the equivalent of eating and then having the energy to work.

When we contemplate, we listen in and out. This is the way to empty the thoughts of expectations and create space to conceive something new, take courage, start. And how to do it when you don’t know where to start?

Take a few moments to reflect, think about what is working in your yard or garden. Enjoy the space, the flowers, the fresh air. See also what is going wrong or bothering you. Make a list of priorities and things that need to be changed and wait a few days.

Studies show that pausing for reflection brings insights, and you’re sure to get one. But if you still have questions, ask someone for help, check out books, magazines. Ask plant store sellers. There are so many things available today that the important thing is to prepare and take one step after another, executing your plan in parts. Make notes so as not to lose information, and when you least expect it you will already have an idea in mind of what to plant, and soon you will have your hands on the earth and tender vegetables to eat.

 I explained a little about the families of vegetables and how we should avoid placing types of the same family always in the same places, which ends up impoverishing the soil, that is, deleting all the nutrients in the ground.

Today I will talk about some families not mentioned yet:

Cucurbitaceae: cucumber, zucchini, pumpkin, melon, gherkin, and watermelon;

lauraceous: almost all herbs used most at homes, such as oregano, lavender, rosemary, basil, and mint;

zingiberaceous: ginger;

grasses: wheat, rice, millet, barley, rye, oats, and corn.

So now that you know some of the principal families, it is worth knowing how to group them in the flower beds and pots making the most of their various shapes.

The logic in the garden is to plant fruits and leaves that require less soil at the beginning of the crops so that the land will gradually be enriched with each species from the fastest to the slowest, from the lowest and aerial to the heaviest and densest.

Here’s an example to make it easier: Carrots, potatoes, and beets are planted after various crops and lettuces, arugula, coriander, and spring onions are suitable for starters.

In the list below, you will find the name of some plants, the time of planting and whether seeds or bulbs make the propagation form, rhizomes (root-shaped stem)  or the separation of clumps. It also describes whether the planting should be final in the flowerbed or sowing and the approximate size of the space for the plant to grow.

This information can still be found on seed packages and can change from one region to another after all our country is vast and has a lot of climatic and geographical diversity.

But don’t forget: before you decide what to plant, look around you. Contemplate your garden or vegetable garden calmly. Inspiration always comes from nature itself.

Pumpkin

year-round

pit

2.5 to 5 x2 to 4m

harvest after transplant

60 to 90 days

Zucchini

March to September

pit 1 to 1.2x 0.6 to 0.7 m

45 to 60 days

Lettuce

March to September

definitive

seed

0.25x 0.25m

35 to 45 days

Garlic

April to September

definitive

bulb

0.25x 0.1m

120 to 140 days

Eggplant

year-round

pit

seeds

1.20 to 1.5 x 0.8m

90 to 110 days

Definitive beet

April to August

0.3x 0.1 to 0.15m

seeds

60 to 80 days

Chives definitive

all year round 0.2 × 0.2m tillers or seeds frequent cuts

Carrot

year

final

0.25 × 0.07 m

seed

90-110 days

Coriander

February to September

definite

0.25 × 0.1m

seed

frequent cuts

Cauliflower

March to September

pit

1 to 0.5m

seed

frequent cuts

Cucumber

March to September

pit

1 to 1.2m x 0.4m

seed

60 to 80 days

Bell pepper

year-round

pit

1 × 0.4x 0.5m

seed

60 to 80 days

Arugula

March to September

definite

0.25 × 0.15m

seed

frequent cuts

Parsley

year-round

pit

0.25 × 0.1m

seed

frequent cuts

Cherry tomatoes

year-roundnd

hole

1.20 x1.5 x 1.5 meters

120 to 140 days

seed

To contemplate is to see with gratitude. Ask yourself when you want to know

Post navigation


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Enter Captcha Here : *

Reload Image